Ghost Shrimp



Ghost Shrimp, also known as Glass Shrimp, are excellent scavengers. They are inexpensive and efficient aquarium cleaners that will actively search for any kind of left over food in your aquarium. Their transparent bodies and frenetic food-searching behavior make Ghost Shrimp an interesting addition to your freshwater aquarium.
The Ghost Shrimp body is transparent, and an orange to yellow colored spot is visible in the center of the tail. The body is segmented, and features ten sets of legs. The first four sets have tiny claws that aid the shrimp in feeding. Ghost Shrimp are relatively small invertebrates, reaching a maximum size of only 2".

An established freshwater aquarium of at least 10 gallons with plenty of hiding places and a mature substrate are the ideal setup for the Ghost Shrimp. It should be housed with small peaceful fish that will not pose a threat of eating these shrimp.

Ghost shrimp will readily breed in the aquarium if kept in large enough groups. The female carries the eggs, which appear as small green dots under the tail. If interested in raising the shrimp, remove the female to a different aquarium until the shrimp hatch. At that point, return the female back to the main aquarium and feed the baby shrimp newly hatched brine shrimp, rotifers, or a suitable liquid food.

Ghost shrimp are an excellent food source for many types of both freshwater and saltwater fish. They are great for getting hard to feed fish such as seahorses, lionfish, grunts, and newly born sharks to begin feeding.

The Ghost Shrimp are omnivores and will consume algae, detritus and left over food. If insufficient food is present, supplement with a quality flake food or pellet.

Quick Stats:
Minimum Tank Size: 10 gallons
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 68-85° F, pH 6.5-8.0, KH 3-10
Max. Size: 2"
Color Form: Clear, Orange, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Farm Raised
Family: Palaeomonidae

Note: This profile is currently incomplete. Description and/or images are temporarily taken from LiveAquaria and will be replaced shortly. If you are interested in writing a new description, please contact me at info@myfishtank.net. If you have any experience with this particular fish, please leave a comment below and share with us.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

jesse December 23, 2010 at 12:27 pm

I love these little shrimp. they are great scavangers,but some fish will readily eat them (large carnivourus mainly sometimes a bigger starving shrimp too)

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