Making A DIY C02 Unit and C02 Mixture Article

Jan 4, 2004
3
0
0
61
Pensacola, FL
Visit site
#21
Using the airstone should create greater surface area to facilitate diffusion much like the reason behind the alveoli in the lungs. Took your advice and placed the stone directly underneath the intake for the powerfilter (probably a 90% capture of CO2 released). We'll see how it works. Thanks!

*celebrate
 

qaffle

Small Fish
Oct 22, 2002
30
0
0
#22
I personally did just about the same setup, but I did a few things different that made the process better, in my opinion, and the setup easier.

On putting the air lines through the cap: First drill the hole a bit smaller then the size of the tubing. Now, cut the tubing on an angle, so the end of the tubing is like so
| |
| /
|/
now stick the end of the tube through the hole and pull it, if you cut the hole small enough you'll probably need to use a pliers (or your teeth) to get the tube through. This will make a very tight seal and probably if done correctly won't need the sealant, although I used it and I would recommend using it.

Next I'd recommend connecting this line to a gang valve (for instance this. This allows for you to do a couple things including:
  • Split your C02 to multiple outputs
  • Run more then one C02 bottle at once. This may not seem useful if you have a small tank, but even then it is. When your one C02 bottle begins to run low you can then mix up another, connect that to the gang valve (depending on which you get you may have to hook it up to one of the outputs and open the valve for that all the way; converting the output to an input MAKE SURE TO OPEN THE VALVE IF YOU DO THIS) and while the second starts to begin to produce the first bottle will be dying off keeping a bit more of a uniform C02 production.
  • When changing your C02 bottle you can just close the valves to keep the line going from the valve to the tank pressurized, getting C02 into your tank faster.
  • Control your C02 output. If you want less C02 you just crack the valve open a small amount leaking it into the room instead of the tank.

Finally I suggest (like previously mentioned) connecting from the gang valve to a bubble counter of sorts. Mine was just a smaller bottle, such as a 1 liter water. To make this you fill the bottle with some water, a third full or so it doesn't matter, then using the same process as used when making the C02 bottles you put 2 holes in the cap; now pull the tube carrying C02 in into the bottle far enough so the end is in the water, again as deep into the water as you want, and stick the tube going out to the tank in the open part of the bottle (the part without water in it).

So my setup was (stopped doing this because i stopped putting that much care into my tanks)
yeast bottle(s)->gang valve->bubble counter->check valve (i didn't actually have one but probably should've)->tank

I never could get the C02 to diffuse properly though... I should post this as an article somewhere...
 

Jul 11, 2003
4
0
0
Visit site
#23
Okay for some reason I've been doing this lately and (though none of the ingredients have changed) things have been going badly. When I add all the ingredients and come back an hour later my sugar has hardened and no activity is taking place. I'm wondering if my room temperature, around 62 degrees, has anything to do with that. I use lukewarm water initially when making it. Thx for any help.
 

depthC

Superstar Fish
Feb 24, 2003
1,417
0
0
WI
#26
Yep bakers yeast is what i use and it works. There are a variety of types of yeast and ive never messed with them but id assume they would work also.

- depthC
 

Vinh

Medium Fish
Jun 25, 2003
54
0
0
Visit site
#28
Im using a 1.25 litre bottom instead with 2cups sugar and nearly tablespoon of yeast. Filled water to the near neck mark where it starts to curve into the lid. Used warm water...

How long should it be if using warm water?
 

depthC

Superstar Fish
Feb 24, 2003
1,417
0
0
WI
#29
Bubbles per second IMO doesnt matter much. When i use fresh yeast that i jsut opened i get 1 bps which is nice but then on my next batches the bubbles come in short 1-2 second bursts. So how many bubbles per second you get is luck i guess.

Using warm water it shouldnt be too long, id say a hour or two but i dont really know. Dont be to worried when it starts, give it a day and if its not working you got bad yeast or a leak in your unit.

- depthC
 

Somonas

Superstar Fish
Oct 22, 2002
2,061
0
0
43
O-town
www.myfishtank.net
#30
I dont use a bubble counter. In my opinion a bubble counter is an unnecessary failure point. If you monitor your PH every couple of days you can get a more accurate idea of your co2 levels then you can get with bubbles per second...
a couple days after I change the bottles I can hear whoosh woosh woosh up the filter intake,,, every 1/2 -1 second, I have no idea how many bubbles are in the woosh, probably more than one. 1 week later the wooshes are farther apart, and then when the PH is around half way between the start (6.0) and neutral, I change one bottle
 

depthC

Superstar Fish
Feb 24, 2003
1,417
0
0
WI
#32
Yeah it produces C02 gas which come out as bubbles. You could hook it up to a airstone and put it in the tank but it wont diffuse much of the C02. So do a little research on better diffusion methods and youll be set.

- depthC
 

TurbineSurgeon

Superstar Fish
Feb 27, 2004
1,227
0
36
58
Dallas, TX
Visit site
#33
Somonas said:
I dont use a bubble counter. In my opinion a bubble counter is an unnecessary failure point.
I use a 1/2 liter bottle with a tube that goes to within a half inch or so of the bottom on the input side, and just a barb on the output side to catch any crud that might enter the tubing and potentially the aquarium. I just noticed on this last fillup that it foamed more than usual, and some yeasty watery sweet stuff got deposited in the bottle. It would have gone into the tank without it.
 

Apr 11, 2004
8
0
0
Visit site
#34
I used a different cap on my CO2 bottle. I used the squirt cap from a Clear Mountain water bottle and put it on a 2 liter Pepsi and it fit like a charm. I then drilled a hole in the center and popped off the piece that slides up and down. I then used a heat gun on one end of the silicone tubing and slid over the piece with the hole in it. I then slid the piece that slides up and down from the other end back into place but extended like it was open. Because of the tubing that now blocks where water used to come out of the nozzle, air can only come out of the tubing and thus I didn't have to use any of my silicone sealant and was able to use it immediately! Hopefully I might be able to post a better description next time
 

Apr 18, 2004
126
0
0
Visit site
#35
could you inactuallity connect an air pump to the bottle at a low PSI. to force the CO2 out under pressure. and if set low enough towards the bottom of the bottle act as a constant agitator to keep the yeast and sugar stirred up. i was asking cuz i have an air pump and am going to try this DIY CO2 set up but was asking because i have read that others are worried about it not produsing the bubbles . and i understand that with the pump you would not know if it was doing its job or not but all it takes is too shut down the air flow to the bottle to check. any comments??
 

bigfoot150

Superstar Fish
Dec 17, 2003
1,023
1
0
39
Alameda, Ca
Visit site
#36
With an air pump hooked up you will get more "air" than CO2. The air that you pump in is not going to displace the CO2 because CO2 is "air" or, more technically, gas. So all you will be doing is pumping air thru the bottle.

Also agitating the yeast with an air stone would be couter-productive imo. The yeast would have a harder time taking in sugars due to the constant movement thus producing less CO2.
 

depthC

Superstar Fish
Feb 24, 2003
1,417
0
0
WI
#39
Nope sorry Flex i dont have one. Its really not that significant, but when i get my cam back later tonight ill be able to take a quick shot for ya.

.depthc