Betta Age Question

Parkedout

Medium Fish
Dec 6, 2012
69
0
0
#1
My betta is as active as ever. But his fins are noticibly shorter (although not shredded or unhealthy looking, except the length) and he is eating less.

I'm afraid he is getting ready to die.

He has been in my home 2.5 years, and was fully grown when I got him. Is that normal aging signs? I'm pretty attached to this (my very first) fish. :)
 

Kiara1125

Superstar Fish
Jan 12, 2011
1,142
0
0
Florida
#2
Well, bettas can live from 2-4 years. My oldest one is approaching 4, but my step mother had a betta who lived to be 8. It was incredible. Genetics and care have a big role in age. I would just keep treating him how you normally do and watch carefully for other signs. Lithium (my oldest betta) is still active and eating well. Keep us updated on how your betta is doing. I hope this helps. :)
 

Fuzz16

Superstar Fish
Oct 20, 2006
1,918
3
0
Wellsville, KS
#4
i think their anywhere from 6-10mon before males full color comes in..but yes care has a LOT to do with it :) a lot of mill bettas in LPS only live for a couple years averagly
 

achase

Large Fish
Feb 1, 2010
765
0
0
British Columbia, Canada
#5
I agree with what everyone has already posted. Continue your regular routine and monitor his behavior.
Have you had any changes with your water parameters? Sometimes slight changes in fish behavior can be a sign that something is different with the water.
 

Jan 15, 2013
43
1
0
#6
The average betta lifespan is 2-3 years. I would say that shortening fins are by no means a sign of approaching death. Instead, I'd opt that it is a case of fin rot. Lots of bettas become infected with fin rot, mine included, and it is by no means fatal. My best recommendation would be to administer Aquarium Salt (available at most pet stores--DO NOT use table salt as this could kill your fish!), which is a stress-reducer and general tonic for all fish. If this doesn't work, a course of Melafix, which treats fin rot, would help kill the infection.
Best of luck to you and your fish!
 

Feb 27, 2009
4,395
0
36
#8
A friend of mine has two Betta splendens that are over 5 yrs old. Both were acquired as adults, so she is not sure how old they really are. One she keeps at her office (she's a laywer) and one at home. She had the one at home first but missed the tranquility of the fish while working long hours. Both live in 10 gallon aquariums with a pair of otos (also now over 5 yrs old) and a large snail of somr sort.
 

big54bob

Superstar Fish
Dec 20, 2006
1,486
6
38
25
On my office chair playing Runescape
#9
The average betta lifespan is 2-3 years. I would say that shortening fins are by no means a sign of approaching death. Instead, I'd opt that it is a case of fin rot. Lots of bettas become infected with fin rot, mine included, and it is by no means fatal. My best recommendation would be to administer Aquarium Salt (available at most pet stores--DO NOT use table salt as this could kill your fish!), which is a stress-reducer and general tonic for all fish. If this doesn't work, a course of Melafix, which treats fin rot, would help kill the infection.
Best of luck to you and your fish!
DO NOT USE MELAFIX WITH LABYRINTH FISH!!!!!! Studies show that is damages their labyrinth organ and can be fatal. Use bettafix, it is a safer alternative to melafix.
 

Feb 27, 2009
4,395
0
36
#10
DO NOT USE MELAFIX WITH LABYRINTH FISH!!!!!! Studies show that is damages their labyrinth organ and can be fatal.
What studies show this?

Use bettafix, it is a safer alternative to melafix.
Bettafix is a diluted version of melafix (more water, less tea tree oil). They are identical otherwise according to API. They sell it as 'bettafix' to help fishkeepers do the smaller doses bettas would need due to the fact that most keep them in small volumes of water.

Interesting to read the post on 1/5/2012 by API/Mars Fishcare. API has been around for decades and is a well known/trusted source of aquarium products

Negative Reaction to BettaFix? (or MelaFix?) - Page 2
 

Thyra

Superstar Fish
Jun 2, 2010
1,891
0
0
Yelm, WA
#14
Joel, it probably wasn't your fault. Bettas are pretty hardy fish - as you know people keep them in tiny bowls for years. They are pretty much man made and so you can expect they inherit problems. Stick with the less expensive ones, I think they are just as pretty IMO and you will eventually rescue a keeper.