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how to promote algae growth

Discussion in 'FreshWater Beginner Information/Questions' started by frankenfish, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. frankenfish

    frankenfish Large Fish

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    basically the title says it all. how can i promote algae growth in my tank? i know thats kind of opposite of what most people need help with in regards to algae but i always thought that a manageable amount of algae adds to the tanks natural feel. not to mention it feeds my otos and snails. currently the tank has in it 2 otos. 1 panda and 1 albino cory (waitin till after christmas to get these guys friends. $$'s tight this time of year) 1 dwarf gourami, 5 neon tetras and 2 large snails(bout as big as a big grape) and 1 small snail. i do weekly water changes and the hood light is on a good 12 hours a day.

    on a side note has anyone ever had apple snails that used to be active suddenly become not active at all and bury themselves in substrate?

    and on a side side note do any of your fish kind of lose their sh*t when you first turn on the light in the morning? my albino cory does almost every time without fail. he'l zip around the tank crashing into things for a few seconds and then goes back to normal like nothing ever happened
     


  2. SlateSpider

    SlateSpider Large Fish

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    I think the sudden bright light is just what makes the cory do that. Anyways, is it really necessary to change the water every week? That is probably why the algae doesn't grow; it doesn't have time to grow! My mom said that when she was in high school, she had a fish tank that she would just set it up and run for several months, without messing with anything. Every few months she would change the water, though. That is what fish like. Changing the water weekly will probably make the fish (as well as your wallet ) unhappy.
     
  3. frankenfish

    frankenfish Large Fish

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    weekly water changes are absolutely necessary. that's not even my opinion its just science. lol. sure the fish can SURVIVE without weekly water changes but they can't THRIVE and they certainly don't like it. i mean, a human can go 3 weeks without food but that's not something you should do regularly. no offense to your mom but she's giving you advice that is not in keeping with what we know to be true about fish care. as for the cost of weekly water changes i only have to buy a bottle of water conditioner every 2 months or so. that certainly won't break the bank.
     
  4. Kiara1125

    Kiara1125 Superstar Fish

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    I agree with FF. I keep my lights (flourescent) on for around 15 hours. They turn on at 5 am and go off at 8 pm. I have plenty of algae growth, and the warmer then water the better, only it's ok if you keep water in the 70's. My Otos always have algae along with my Snails.

    SS, people used to only do water changes once a month. This isn't bad, but the more water changes the better. I do two 40% water changes (60% for the fry cuz I know what I'm doing) every other week. My fish love it and it keeps the water in pristine condition. You don't have to do water changes this often, but it will improve the health of your fish, having them get sick less and grow and breed more. Changing the water makes fish happier and doesn't hurt your wallet. Also, algae grows on the objects in the tank, it doesn't float around. It has plently of time to grow and poor water conditions also lead to poor algae growth. No offense about your mom, but we probably have better advice and more experience than she does. She probably had her fish die, not saying that that's what happened. Ever since I started in the fishkeeping hobby, my parents' bill hasn't gone up at all. As long as you use the right filters, heaters, and lights, they can be economical too and save you money. All I ask is, please don't go around and stating information unless if you are 110% (yes 110%) sure that it's fact and not opinion when it comes to fishkeeping. I'm not trying to be mean, but people come onto these sites looking for proper information about fishkeeping and if they stumble upon the wrong post, their fish have to pay the price. It's like flushing a live fish down the toilet and expecting it to get to the ocean. Purely impossible.
     
  5. Lotus

    Lotus Ultimate Fish
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    One way to get some algae into your tank for your fish and snails (without making the whole tank a mess) is to grow algae outside the tank. Put a few stones in a container of tank water on the windowsill (or another sunny spot) and switch them out when the fish have eaten the algae. Flat stones/larger pebbles work for this.

    While a little algae in the tank is fine, when there's too much, it does tend to spoil the look of the tank. The other problem is that you can't control what kind of algae you get. You may end up with an algae your fish and snails don't really like.

    I agree that weekly water changes is the best for your fishes' health.

    On the lighting, the fish may be less jumpy if you have the room light on for a while before you turn on the full lights. That way, it's less shocking to them.
     
  6. frankenfish

    frankenfish Large Fish

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    oooh thats a good idea. i'l have to grab some rocks and give that a try *thumbsups
     
  7. OrangeCones

    OrangeCones Elite Fish

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    You can grow 'algae logs' as well as 'algae rocks' in a sunny spot. I've been doing both for years and its the best way to keep otos fed.
     
  8. KcMopar

    KcMopar Superstar Fish

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    To grow algae you can get a light in the 2700K spectrum, this light will have more of the red spectrum in it which will encourage algae and plant growth. The red is not visable to the human eye as it still looks white to us. You might even check out the algae scrubber post http://www.myfishtank.net/forum/sal...a-powerful-nitrate-phosphate-remover-diy.html, I use these devises with much success on my salt water tanks and have one on my freshwater 150G.
     
  9. SlateSpider

    SlateSpider Large Fish

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    Everything I post is just my opinion, unless I really know what I'm talking about.
     
  10. exhumed07

    exhumed07 Superstar Fish

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    I used to do weekly water changes and then i would happen to get busy and then it became bi weekely and then monthly. and in my tanks i have noticed very little to 0 change. water is crystal clear, parameters are always good with nitrites and ammonia. and my cichlids still breed prolificly. and i do a 50% once every 2 months and a 75% every 6 months. but i have a friend about 10 miles away, he has a 30 gallon with 8 cichlids in it and he has to do a water change every week cause the water starts to get cloudy and gets an odor. i think it is all on the person and the fish and the specific situation. if u can get away with only doing a water change every couple months then go that route if u choose too. it's all personal preference and as long as the fish are not dieing cause of it.
     
  11. lauraf

    lauraf Superstar Fish

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    Ya, but, exhumed, you seem to know what your water parameters are . . . if you don't have a proper test kit you don't know what's going on with your nitrate levels, let alone any nitrite or ammonia. SS, if your water tests 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite and less than 20ppm nitrate, then you don't need to do a water change. If you show any ammonia or nitrite (i.e., an uncycled or overstocked tank) or your nitrate levels are above 20, then it's time for a water change, regardless of what your mom says, no offense to your mom.
     
  12. Kiara1125

    Kiara1125 Superstar Fish

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    It's different for everyone. I have to don't have to do water changes in my Goldfish tank when I have to change the water in my 10g's. I change the water anyway. SlateSpider has a10g, therefore it's best if she does water changes more frequently then just once a month. Plus, now she has Molly fry to care for. For their wellbeing, it's best if they had the most pristine water that she can give them.
     
  13. exhumed07

    exhumed07 Superstar Fish

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    I test my water about every other week for ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and oxygen.
     
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