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how many tetra in 2.5 gallon tank?

This is a discussion on how many tetra in 2.5 gallon tank? within the FreshWater Beginner Information/Questions forums, part of the FreshWater Topics category;
I'd say 3-4 tetras also. Make sure to get little tetras-neons, black neons, cardinals, lemons, or embers (hard to find). ...

  1. #1
    Super Fish CAPSLOCK's Avatar
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    I'd say 3-4 tetras also. Make sure to get little tetras-neons, black neons, cardinals, lemons, or embers (hard to find). Rasboras would work too, I've heard they're a bit more exciting than tetras.

    Other possible choices: guppies, a dwarf gourami and a pair of african dwarf frogs, or white cloud mountain minnows.

    Edit: Wow, what happened to the order of replies on this thread?
    Last edited by CAPSLOCK; 11-28-2005 at 04:11 AM.
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    Teenie Weenie Fish
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    Default how many tetra in 2.5 gallon tank?

    Hi, I'm new with this hobby and I'm planning to get a starter kit that's 2.5 gallon and planning to start with tetra fish...just wondering how many tetras I can put in the tank. Thanks.

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    Super Fish Pure's Avatar
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    3-4 max, any more than that and you would be over stocked, and also risk nipped fins. Tetras when confined and not kept in proper schools (at least 6) often resort to violence. In fact some species of tetras are down right nasty to any other smaller or slower fish no matter how many you have.

    A sugestion... If you are going to take the plunge. Invest in at least a 29 gal to start.. You have way more choices of fish you can keep and thus are less likely to get bored with the hobby. Not to mention smaller tanks actually require more work and are more touch about changes in their water parameters. These changes happen every time you do a water change. Also the common neon tetra isn't the best beginner fish. They tend to be quite touchy about their water parameters and often are lost to beginner mistakes.

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    Large Fish echoofformless's Avatar
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    Forgive my arrogance in seeming like a know-it-all, but zebra danios are probably the absolute best fish to start off with in an uncycled tank. Especially when you consider how small your tank is, you'll want smaller fish who are tolerant of varying water conditions. I'd say to buy two of those, and then wait for the tank to cycle before adding any more fish. Just remember not to overcrowd, a tank that small won't allow you much more than 4-5 small fish. So if you want neons, add 2 or 3 of those after you cycle. At that point you'll pretty much be complete.

    Good luck!
    Smart enough to get a dagger past your guards, old man.

  5. #5
    Teenie Weenie Fish
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    um....if I were to use the 2.5 gallon space....which fish would be the best for beginners? I heard bettas are a good start...but I don't really like them..Is there any other choice?

    thanks.

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    Teenie Weenie Fish Fantail_Lover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boblee
    Hi, I'm new with this hobby and I'm planning to get a starter kit that's 2.5 gallon and planning to start with tetra fish...just wondering how many tetras I can put in the tank. Thanks.
    LOL, none

    get a bigger tank
    12 gallon Eclipse ~ 1 Red Ryukin, 1 Calico Ryukin,
    2 Hornworts and 3 someother kinda plant thingy...

    Water Parameters:
    Nitrate: 20ppm
    Nitrite: 0ppm
    Hardness: 150ppm (Hard)
    Alkalinity: 120ppm
    pH: 7.2
    Ammonia: 0ppm

    2.5 gallon ~ with air rock! Yay!
    Water Parameters:
    N/A

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    I'm agreed with the general concensus that a 2.5g to start with is typically not a good idea. The smaller a tank is, the more prone it is to fluctuations in chemistry and temperature.

    The only thing I would keep in a 2.5g would be a single betta. I know you said you don't like them, but have you ever seen one in a tank that it has room to swim in? They are beautiful fish with _tons_ of personality... but that is unfortunately lost when you stick them in a cup.

    Both Danios and Tetras are schooling fish, in the wild they live in groups of thousands. IMO, having less than 10-15 in a tank isn't even worth it, and will cause a lot of undue stress on your fish.

    I also disagree with using "hardy" fish like Danios to cycle your tank. Just becuase they're more likely to survive the toxic chemicals that build up during the cycling process doesn't mean it's good for them, and IMO, they shouldn't be subjected to it. I would reccomend you read up on Fishless Cycling, it has a lot of advantages, not the least of which is that it spares your fish a lot of stress.

    ~JW

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    Large Fish echoofformless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWright
    I'm agreed with the general concensus that a 2.5g to start with is typically not a good idea. The smaller a tank is, the more prone it is to fluctuations in chemistry and temperature.

    The only thing I would keep in a 2.5g would be a single betta. I know you said you don't like them, but have you ever seen one in a tank that it has room to swim in? They are beautiful fish with _tons_ of personality... but that is unfortunately lost when you stick them in a cup.

    Both Danios and Tetras are schooling fish, in the wild they live in groups of thousands. IMO, having less than 10-15 in a tank isn't even worth it, and will cause a lot of undue stress on your fish.

    I also disagree with using "hardy" fish like Danios to cycle your tank. Just becuase they're more likely to survive the toxic chemicals that build up during the cycling process doesn't mean it's good for them, and IMO, they shouldn't be subjected to it. I would reccomend you read up on Fishless Cycling, it has a lot of advantages, not the least of which is that it spares your fish a lot of stress.

    ~JW

    My experience with danios tells me otherwise. I used two to start my tank and they showed no signs of stress at all throughout the whole process. Of course I did to scheduled water changes and fed them sparingly.

    Those two danios not only survived, but thrived. I only lost one of them a few months ago, and the other is still alive. That tank was started in May of 2003. Plus, when the one died, the ther lived just as happily on his own until I gave him a new friend a few weeks later. Both of them are perfectly happy with each other, acting like the nippy zippy little fish that a danio should be. Just because certain fish are schooling types, doesn't mean they won't do okay in groups of less than ten. In fact, they can do fine with just two or three.

    Fishless cycling can be a real challenge, especially for a beginner. Plus I just feel it's unnatural and kind of technical / boring. While I agree it is better than subjecting fish to stress, and I will likely use it for my next tank, I still think that a good hardy fish like a danio or a black tetra, fed sparingly and given good water maintenance, will do just fine.

    That's just my experience. I'm sure posts of disagreement will follow.
    Smart enough to get a dagger past your guards, old man.

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    Large Fish lordroad's Avatar
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    I think a 2.5 gallon tank is a great place to start.

    I recommend 4-5 harlequin rasboras and a mystery snail or shrimp of some sort.

    Also white clouds would be cool too, like Caps suggested. 3 harlequins and 2 white clouds would be neat.

    Change out a gallon of water once a week and stock it with live plants and you can easily have 5 small fish like these.

    Try to find some Biospira to instantly cycle your tank. The smallest container would be fine for your little tank and is well worth the cost. And don't let your LFS push off some Cycle or any other crap on you--they don't work.

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    Large Fish echoofformless's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=lordroad]
    I recommend 4-5 harlequin rasboras and a mystery snail or shrimp of some sort.

    QUOTE]


    I would think harlequins would be a bit crowded at that number. But more importantly, they are not extremely hardy and are known to be sensitive to water conditions. I waited a long time before introducing mine. I'd suggest you avoid them until the tank is cycled and stable.
    Smart enough to get a dagger past your guards, old man.

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